Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Skyndi-kjötbollur

Fast made meatballs


Meatballs are very popular in Scandinavia. Who doesn't know Swedish "köttbullar" from Ikea restaurants? In Iceland they are named "kjötbollur" and their popularity is similar. Here we have a very simple recipe, well suited for campsite cooking especially.


Ingredients

600 g ground meat
1 sachet instant leek soup
20 salted crackers
1 egg
2 Tbsp oil


Preparation

Crumble the crackers, add the meat, the soup powder and the egg. Mix and knead everything. Form ping-pong ball-sized balls.

Heat oil in a pan and fry the meatballs until crispy brown from all sides.


If you like sauce for the meatballs, here a very simple recipe:

Put 150 g hot meat stock, 150 g redcurrent jelly and a shot of whipping cream into a pan, stir everything and let simmer for 5 minutes. That's it.


Saturday, September 15, 2018

Grautarlummur

Rice pudding patties


Here once again a very classically Icelandic dish as it is know by many Icelanders from their "Amma" (= grandma): Icelandic pancakes called "Lummur". If you ever have rice pudding left over from yesterday, then this is the perfact way for its utilization.


Ingredients for 12 pieces

200 g rice pudding
200 g flour
1 Tbsp sugar
1 tsp baking powder
1 egg
1 pinch of vanilla
200 ml milk
50 g raisins


Preparation

In a large bowl mix rice pudding, flour, sugar and baking powder.


Add the egg and a pinch of vanilla.


Finally stir in milk and raisins.


Mix everything until it is a smooth dough.


Drop tablespoons of the mixture into a pancake pan...


... and fry them from both sides until golden brown.


Sprinkle the lummur with sugar and serve them with fresh fruits, stewed fruits or marmalade.




Thursday, September 13, 2018

Gamla Bakaríið in Ísafjörður

The "Old Bakary"


The first bakary in Iceland was Bernhöftsbakarí. It was founded in Reykjavík in 1834. I already visited it on my "Reykjavík Food Walk".

The second bakary in Iceland followed in 1868 in Akureyri und the thiord one in 1871 Ísafjörður. This still exists and runs as "gamla bakaríið", literally meaning "the old bakary".


On the square in front of the store, you normally can see this beautiful old car advertising the bakary.


In addition to the salesroom, the bakary has a guest are, where you can sit and have breakfast, drink coffee and eat cake. But we didn't try it.

On one afternoon sduring our stay in Ísafjörður we took a look at the old bakary. Unfortunately we were quite late. Hence the choice of cake was manageable. And the young sales assistant seemed a bit clumsy, when she wrapped up our order. Anyhow, this did not bother us.

We bought following selection: rabarbarasnitta (rhubarb cake), skúffukaka (chocolate cake) and vínarbrauð (Vienna bread, here made with yeast dough).

I can recommend all three kinds of cake. Child no. 2 was deeply impressed by the Vienna bread.




Monday, August 27, 2018

Plokkfiskur

Mashed Fish


In former times, fish and potatoes had been a kind of basic foodstuffs in Iceland. Both were widely available and inexpensive. Hence in many families both, potatoes and fish, were served several times a week. And also the leftovers had not been thrown away. Instead of this, they were mashed and mixed together. The result was "plokkfiskur". Today it's usually not made from leftovers, but from fresh fish. But it is still a very common, typically Icelandic food - and very tasty, by the way.

Ingredients

500 g boiled haddock
500 g boiled potatoes
1 onion
350 ml milk
50 g butter
3 Tbsp flour
white pepper
salt
50 g grated cheese

Preparation

Split the fish into small flakes. Cut the boiled potatoes into small pieces, too. Chop the onion.

In a small pan heat up the milk slowly.

In another pan melt butter and steam the chopped onion glassy. Add the flour and bring to the boil for about a minute. Then slowly pour in the heated milk while stirring continuously. Let it simmer for 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

Put the pieces of fish and potatoes into an ovenproof dish and mix them.

Pour the sauce over it and sprinkle with grated cheese.

Bake everything in the oven at 200 °C for about 20 minutes.


Then serve the plokkfiskur - maybe with some boiled potatoes, fresh tomatoes and a slice of dark rye bread with salted butter.

Even if such a mash might not be very impressive in look, it is really wonderful in taste!


Friday, August 24, 2018

Brúnaðar kartöflur

Caramelized potatoes


Ingredients

1 kg potatoes
60 g sugar
40 g butter

Preparation

On the preceding evening boil the potatoes in salted water and peel them while hot. Depending on the size of the potatoes, cut them into walnut-sized pieces. Store them in a cool place over night.

On the next day, melt sugar in a pan stirring occasionally, until it becomes brown. Add butter and melt it, too.

Then add the cold potatoes and stir, until they are hot and caramelized from all sides.

Instead of butter you can use cream alternatively. Or you can replace half of the butter by 2 Tbsp of coffee. Just depending on your taste and which ingredients you have available.


The caramelized potatoes served with white sauce and green peas are the classical side dish for a typically Icelandic Sunday roast. On the picture above we had spinach instead of peas.



Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Kartöflumús með bjarnarlaukur

Mashed potatoes with wild garlic


Ingredients

800 g potatoes
350 ml milk
60 g fresh wild garlic
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp salt


Preparation

Boil the potatoes unpeeled in salted water until soft. Let them cool down a bit and peel them while warm. Cut the peeled potatoes into large pieces and place them into a large pot.

Wash and clean the wild garlic. Put it into a blender, add the milk and puree finely.


Add the wild garlic milk to the potatoes and let everything simmer at medium heat for about 10 minutes.

Mash the potatoes and stir everything thoroughly.

Finally season with sugar and salt. If you have it available, use licorice salt to give the meal that last little touch.

 



Saturday, August 18, 2018

Anís kerfils lakkris salt

Anise chervil licorice salt


Ingredients

200 g coarse sea salt
2 Tbsp chervil, dried (preferably spanish chervil)
2 tsp licorice powder
1 tsp anise oil


Preparation

Mix sea salt, chervil and licorice powder.


Grind the mixture in small portions in a mortar.


Stir in the anise oil.


Then spread the salt on a baking tray covered with baking paper and let in dry in the oven at 50 °C for 2 to 3 hours.

During drying you will notice an intense smell of anise!


The salt is suited very well to sweet desserts, but also to fish dishes.